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Dino's Guitars Bubble Box Vibrato/Tremolo Review


Dino''s Guitars Bubble Box Vibrato/Tremolo
Download Example 1
Vibrato Mode
Download Example 2
Tremolo Mode
Recorded with a Fender Duo-Sonic into the Bubble Box into a Fender Deluxe.
Throughout the years, it has become apparent that the Italians are continuing their role as master craftsman. Ferrari and Lamborghini still evoke awe in the automotive world and musically speaking, their attention to fine craftsmanship remains true through companies like Dino’s Guitars. Dino’s Guitars’ recent guitar, speaker and pedal offerings show a dedication to detail as well as the player’s needs. Recent reviews of the Rust Box and Dynabox have praised the Savona, Italy company’s dedication to musicians, a dedication epitomized in their latest offering of the Bubble Box.

Like all Dino’s pedals, the Bubble Box is a mix of PCB and point-to-point construction. The company claims this provides consistency, reliability and great tone. Lucky for us the tester unit delivered on that statement to its fullest. The true bypass Bubble Box offers a handful of options not found in most tremolo or vibrato pedals. The lightweight aluminum chassis hosts the classic Rate and Depth knobs found on most modulation-style effects.

Dino’s also added a Master Volume and a very useful Tweak knob. In Tremolo mode the Tweak knob functions as a gain control, adding a cool crunch tone to your sound. Turning the Tweak knob down to zero returns it to a clean tone. This added feature proves very useful in adding just a hint of breakup without using your amp or a separate overdrive for some extra hair and grit.

The secret weapon of the Bubble Box is its three-way mini toggle switch. Upon first glance, you would assume that it is actually a two-way toggle, switching from tremolo to vibrato, but there’s an added bonus. The middle position is a booster/crunch mode that is very reminiscent of another Dino’s creation: the Dynabox. While in the middle position, the Tweak knob becomes a gain, controlling the amount of crunch and the Master Volume becomes the boost. Like the Dynabox, the middle position can add a nice hint of breakup without having to use a separate overdrive. This works particularly well with an already dirty amp for a little extra sonic drive.

Playing off of Dino’s love for Fender-style instruments, the Bubble Box was initially tested with a modified Telecaster into a Fender Bassman. Starting in Tremolo mode with the Tweak knob set to clean, and the Rate and Depth controls set to twelve o’clock, the Bubble Box was engaged. One word describes the sound of the Bubble Box: lush. The tremolo effect was nice and full, resulting in a great fifties-style tone that is nothing short of infectious. Utilizing the Bubble Box’s Tweak knob, I dialed in a bit of crunch that responded exceptionally well to a vintage Epiphone Sheraton. The end result was a robust effect perfect for both lead and rhythm parts.

Sticking with the Sheraton/Bassman combination, the Bubble Box was switched to the Vibrato mode. Again, the Dino delivered. This time the Leslie-style effect was nice and full, and the Rate and Depth knobs helped dial it into a rotary dream come true. After this, I switched to the middle position for some crunch. With the Tweak knob around three o’clock, the mini-humbuckers of the Sheraton helped to get a great speaker breakup tone that had me playing blues riffs for the rest of the eve. This is definitely a cool added feature.

If you need a good multi-purpose modulation effect then this may be worth checking out. The boys from Italy at Dino’s are consistently making great tone-based products for today’s players. Now I am craving pasta. Ciao.
Buy if...
you are into a high-quality tremolo pedal with added features.
Skip if...
you are on a tight budget.
Rating...
4.0

MSRP $260 Street $199 - Dino''s Guitars - dinosguitars.com

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