Giveaways January 2015

January 15

Lead

Triad Pairs

January 17, 2011
Using triad pairs is simply an intervallic approach to improvisation. When used correctly, the technique can generate some very interesting sounds.
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Super Locrian Improv: Jazz-Rock Fusion Applications for this Mode of the Melodic Minor Scale

January 17, 2011
A useful mode of the melodic minor is known as Super Locrian. This is the seventh mode of melodic minor.
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Guide-Tone Arpeggios

January 17, 2011
Exploring ways to focus our single-note lines and interject some cool voice-leading ideas into our vanilla arpeggios.
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Country Guitar Endings: Classic Lines to Bring the Song to a Convincing Close

January 17, 2011
Country tunes can be brought to a close in a number of ways: vamping on the song’s last chord, tossing in an interesting harmonic twist, interjecting one of several classic bluegrass clichés, or unleashing a barn-burning, country-fried double-stop lick.
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Twang 101: Rockabilly Intros and Outros

January 6, 2011
Bookend your rockabilly tunes with these popular intros and outros.
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Triad Arpeggios Applied

January 6, 2011
Using triad arpeggios over a progression to make your playing more melodic.
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Lethal Guitar: Lydian Jumpstart

December 30, 2010
Using the Lydian mode in the style of Steve Vai
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Combining Techniques

December 21, 2010
Creating new licks and sequences using string skipping, barring, and hammer-ons from nowhere.
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All That Remains: Against the Wind

December 21, 2010
Oli Herbert and Mike Martin of All That Remains talk about their new album, "For We Are Many," how John Mayer and the blues figure into their band dynamic, and how they couldn’t care less what orthodox headbangers think of their melodic metal.
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Tapping Technique: Bi-Dextral Hammer-Ons in the Style of Eddie Van Halen

December 21, 2010
Often referred to as two-hand tapping, this technique was revolutionized and popularized by Eddie Van Halen in the late 1970s (“Eruption,” 1978) and taken to extremes by guitarists such as Steve Vai, Joe Satriani, Jennifer Batten, and jazz great Stanley Jordan.
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