Giveaways January 2015

January 15

Rhythm & Grooves

Rhythm & Grooves: Exercise Your Independence

November 15, 2011
Another aspect of fingerstyle technique: fretting-finger independence.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Spin the Wheel, Map the Fretboard

September 20, 2011
Learning to name the notes on the fretboard is a big deal. The goal is to be able to press any string to any fret and immediately identify the resulting note.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Running in Circles

August 16, 2011
Do you ever feel trapped on the fretboard? Comfortable in certain keys, but utterly lost in others? If so, you’re not alone.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Guitar George

July 19, 2011
Choose a note and then play as many chords as possible that each include this particular tone in the identical fretboard location.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Sparkle Voicings

June 14, 2011
In this lesson, we’ll adapt—and greatly simplify—Lenny Breau’s approach, and use it to generate chord voicings that would be difficult or impossible to play with standard guitar technique.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Stealth Quartal Colors

May 17, 2011
For two months now, we’ve been investigating quartal harmony and learning how to use fourths as building blocks for our chord voicings, rather than the traditional thirds. We’ve looked
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Rhythm & Grooves: Crazy Quartal Comping

April 19, 2011
In this lesson, we’ll map out three-note forms on the lower string sets and then test-drive larger four- and five-note quartal voicings.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Exploring Quartal Harmony

March 15, 2011
Rather than using major and minor thirds—the intervals found in typical chordal harmony—we’re going to use fourths as our harmonic building blocks.
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Rhythm & Grooves: Open for Business

February 15, 2011
In this third and final part of our series, we’ll integrate some of the different forms we’ve discovered thus far and continue to blanket the fretboard with fresh chordal colors.
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Going Up?

January 17, 2011
We’re in the process of exploring ways to make three-note voicings sound bigger than typical triads.
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