Photo by Tom Moberly.

6V6GT

  • NOS electrical specs (GE essential characteristics)
  • Classification by construction: “beam power amplifier”
  • Filament volts: 6.3 V
  • Filament current: 0.45 A
  • Max plate volts and watts: 350 V, 14 W
  • Max screen volts and watts: 315 V, 2.2 W


1950s Fender Tweed Champ. Photo courtesy of Tim Mullally and Dave's Guitar Shop.

Like a small cousin of the 6L6, the 6V6 started out as a metal tube in the 1930s. Developments in the 1940s culminated in the glass 6V6GT we know today. Because the original metal 6V6 is no longer made, most guitarists simply refer to the 6V6GT as “6V6.” The 6V6GT is commonly associated with Fender student-model amps of the ’50s and ’60s, like the Princeton and Champ. Eric Clapton recorded “Layla” with Derek and the Dominos using a Champ.


1960s Fender Blackface Princeton—the 6V6GT has a more straightforward tone than the 6L6GC, with reduced low-end and a little less treble chime. Photo courtesy of Tim Mullally and Dave's Guitar Shop.

The 6V6GT has a more straightforward tone than the 6L6GC, with reduced low-end and a little less treble chime. It breaks up into overdrive more easily, and it can be useful for getting classic American tone with power tube distortion at relatively low levels.