Photo 1.
Photo courtesy of Allparts.com

Does your Tele suffer from “wobbly jack cap” syndrome? Here’s a cheap and easy fix.

If you’ve ever owned a Telecaster, you may know how frustrating it is if the 1/4" output jack starts to get loose. On a Tele, the jack is held in a recessed cup secured to the body with a metal retainer clip embedded in the jack cavity. Over time, the simple action of plugging and unplugging your cable can bend or loosen the clip, making the signal short out while you’re playing.

Fortunately, there’s an excellent alternative to using a Tele’s stock jack mounting hardware. Made by Electrosocket and available from such luthier suppliers as Allparts and Stewart-MacDonald, as well as vendors on Reverb.com and eBay, the machined aluminum jack mount attaches to the Tele body with two screws (Photo 1). The Electrosocket is inexpensive, easy to install, and—get this—it lets you adjust the output jack to accommodate a right-angle plug. Here’s the best part: The Electrosocket stays put and can even prolong the life of your output jack. Let’s investigate, shall we?

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In this step-by-step tutorial, Nashville guitar tech John LeVan demonstrates how to “float” a two-post Stratocaster tremolo so it can both lower and raise the strings’ pitch.

If your Strat-style guitar’s vibrato system has a hardtail setup or the whammy bar is currently configured to simply lower notes, you’ll discover how easy it is to adjust the trem for subtle up-and-down movements. If you’re into Hendrix-inspired rhythm guitar, classic surf, vintage rockabilly, or ’60s spy and space instrumentals, a floating trem is essential for nailing authentic sounds.

In this step-by-step tutorial, Nashville guitar tech John Levan shows you how to convert a standard acoustic flattop into a high-strung guitar. He also offers valuable tips on checking neck relief and action, carving a bone string nut and filing nut slots, and carving and a bone saddle. Bonus! Want to hear a high-strung guitar in action? Check out the short demo following this how-to video.



In this step-by-step tutorial, Nashville guitar tech John Levan shows you how to convert a standard acoustic flattop into a high-strung guitar. He also offers valuable tips on checking neck relief and action, carving a bone string nut and filing nut slots, and carving and a bone saddle. Bonus! Want to hear a high-strung guitar in action? Check out the short demo following this how-to video.

In this step-by-step tutorial, Nashville guitar tech John LeVan demonstrates how to convert an electric guitar with a bolt-on neck into a growling baritone. He also offers valuable tips on installing tuners, adjusting a truss rod, filing nut slots, balancing pickup output, and setting intonation. Also see our photo and text tutorial here.



In this step-by-step tutorial, Nashville guitar tech John LeVan demonstrates how to convert an electric guitar with a bolt-on neck into a growling baritone. He also offers valuable tips on installing tuners, adjusting a truss rod, filing nut slots, balancing pickup output, and setting intonation.

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