Stompboxtober Day 20: Outlaw Effects

Enter here for your chance to WIN an Outlaw Effects Five O'Clock Fuzz or Quick Draw Delay! Giveaway Ends October 21, 2021.


Five O'Clock Fuzz

The Outlaw Effects Five O'Clock Fuzz gives you loads of rich, cascading sustain with crisp attack and subtle compression. Use the controls to go from waxy smooth, violin-like sustain to grittier tones with razor-sharp bite. Perfectly sculpt your fuzz tone into everything from the thick leads of 1970's classic rock to heavier alternative sounds of the 80's and 90's. Featuring True Bypass switching to maintain the purity of your clean tone, Five O'Clock Fuzz delivers a wide array of fuzz tones in a compact package.

Outlaw Effects
$55

Quick Draw Delay

The Outlaw Effects Quick Draw is an analog-voiced delay pedal the delivers crisp tone with warm repeats that dissolve naturally into your sound. With is broad range of delay time (from 20ms to 620ms), Quick Draw can delivery everything from a tight rockabilly slap-back sound to lengthy, ethereal repeats that build into self-oscillation for otherworldly-sounding effects. Quick Draw maintains an organic distinction between the original note and its echoes, meaning you can fill a room with ambient sounds without having your guitar become lost in the mix. A subtle analog warble in the repeats gives Quick Draw a hint of vintage tape-echo quality, and the pedal features True Bypass switching to maintain the purity of your clean tone.

Outlaw Effects
$69

For at least a decade, the classic Ampeg SVT was the dominant bass amp for power and tone.

Photo courtesy of ampeg.com

From the giant, hefty beasts of yore to their modern, ultra-portable equivalents, bass amps have come a long way. So, what's next?

Bassists are often quite well-informed about the details of their instruments, down to the finest technical specs. Many of us have had our share of intense discussions about the most minute differences between one instrument and another. (And sometimes those are interrupted by someone saying, "It's all in the fingers.") But right behind our backs, at the end of our output cables, there is a world of tone-shaping that we either simply ignore or just don't want to dive into too deeply. Turning a gear discussion from bass to amp is a perfect way to bring it to an abrupt end.

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Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.

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