rev peyton

With the smooth, slightly serrated tone that comes from his Silvertone 1484 and custom Daddy Mojo guitar, Rev. Peyton has plenty to smile about.

How an old Silvertone 1484 became the foundation of this roots-guitar power player's sound.

Roots-guitar badass Rev. Peyton plays with the intensity of a charging bison. That ferocity comes from his fast, hyper-accurate picking hand blended with dexterous fretting, and it gets juiced by dirty crushed-velvet tones from a variety of evocative guitars: custom Nationals and a mother-of-pearl covered Daddy Mojo, an original 1954 Supro Dual Tone prototype, a Kay Speed Demon, and more. But the foundation for his retro-modern sound is a workhorse from 1964: a Silvertone 1484 head, which drives his 2x12 Ted Weber custom cabinet.

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John 5 on How He Gets Old-School Tones from His Metal-Friendly Tele | The Big 5

Plus, find out which guitar hero the Rob Zombie sideman “begs and pleads” with you to listen to.

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For at least a decade, the classic Ampeg SVT was the dominant bass amp for power and tone.

Photo courtesy of ampeg.com

From the giant, hefty beasts of yore to their modern, ultra-portable equivalents, bass amps have come a long way. So, what's next?

Bassists are often quite well-informed about the details of their instruments, down to the finest technical specs. Many of us have had our share of intense discussions about the most minute differences between one instrument and another. (And sometimes those are interrupted by someone saying, "It's all in the fingers.") But right behind our backs, at the end of our output cables, there is a world of tone-shaping that we either simply ignore or just don't want to dive into too deeply. Turning a gear discussion from bass to amp is a perfect way to bring it to an abrupt end.

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