Lessons

Diatonic sequences are powerful tools. Here’s how to use them wisely.

Advanced

Beginner

• Understand how to map out the neck in seven positions.
• Learn to combine legato and picking to create long phrases.
• Develop a smooth attack—even at high speeds.

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Knowing how to function in different keys is crucial to improvising in any context. One path to fretboard mastery is learning how to move through positions across the neck. Even something as simple as a three-note-per-string major scale can offer loads of options when it’s time to step up and rip. I’m going to outline seven technical sequences, each one focusing on a position of a diatonic major scale. This should provide a fun workout for the fingers and hopefully inspire a few licks of your own.
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Johnny Winter's Burning Blues by Corey Congilio

Learn to rip like one of the all-time masters of modern electric blues.

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It’s all about melody, reverb, and loud amps.

Beginner

Beginner

• Explore fundamental twangy guitar techniques.

• Learn what gear provides that magical twangy sound.

• Discover how to create your own instrumental guitar versions of timeless folks songs.

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Unlike many of my previous lessons for Premier Guitar, where I’ve broken down techniques into discrete parts, this time I’ve chosen to emulate many of the legends of the 1950s and ’60s by arranging classic folk melodies for twang guitar. For instance, in 1959 Johnny and the Hurricanes recorded the folk tune “Red River Valley” under the name “Red River Rock,” which the Ventures later covered. The Ventures also recorded the Bahamian folk tune “Sloop John B,” Roy Clark recorded “Weepin’ Willow Twist” (his version of the old-time/bluegrass standard “Bury Me Under the Weeping Willow Tree”), and, of course, there’s Dick Dale’s version of “Miserlou,” an Eastern Mediterranean folk melody. Thus, I’m following in their footsteps. Each piece features highlighted twang characteristics such as bends, hammer-ons, whammy bar technique, and effects.

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