licks

Photo by Andrej Zeman from Pexels

The riffs, the fills, the tones. What's not to love?

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Understand how to craft melodic licks in the style of Brent Mason, Pete Anderson, and others.
  • Create flowing open-string licks.
  • Learn how to combine blues with bluegrass.
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Mainstream country music in the '90s was a guitar-lover's dream. Nearly every tune on the radio was full of tasty fills and ripping—but short—solos. The most prominent session player during this time was Brent Mason, whose car primer gray Tele became as iconic as the parts he crafted.

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