supro lexington

The Supro Lexington sports one volume dial and two tone knobs, plus a complex series of "tone-shading" switches.

The circuit design on this Supro Lexington is among Valco's strange but adventurous experiments.

The old Valco company holds a real fascination for me. Back in the day, the U.S. had major guitar companies like Fender, Gibson, Gretsch, and Rickenbacker. And then there was the slightly odder, slightly weirder Valco, which set out to compete with the higher-profile brands, but always approached the endeavor with a really strange game plan.

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John 5 on How He Gets Old-School Tones from His Metal-Friendly Tele | The Big 5

Plus, find out which guitar hero the Rob Zombie sideman “begs and pleads” with you to listen to.

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For at least a decade, the classic Ampeg SVT was the dominant bass amp for power and tone.

Photo courtesy of ampeg.com

From the giant, hefty beasts of yore to their modern, ultra-portable equivalents, bass amps have come a long way. So, what's next?

Bassists are often quite well-informed about the details of their instruments, down to the finest technical specs. Many of us have had our share of intense discussions about the most minute differences between one instrument and another. (And sometimes those are interrupted by someone saying, "It's all in the fingers.") But right behind our backs, at the end of our output cables, there is a world of tone-shaping that we either simply ignore or just don't want to dive into too deeply. Turning a gear discussion from bass to amp is a perfect way to bring it to an abrupt end.

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