Sometimes slow and steady doesn’t win the race.

Advanced

Intermediate

• Develop a better sense of shred.

• Understand how to phrase in odd-numbered groups.

• Create blistering pentatonic lines in the style of Joe Bonamassa and Eric Johnson

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Since blues playing and improvisation is based around vocabulary, you can’t just throw in intervallic fusion lines or neoclassical sweep arpeggios and expect them to fit. Don’t get me wrong, I’m all for experimenting with sounds from different genres, but you’ll want to pick the right moments to work in these ideas. Having a strong foundation in the blues will ground the listener and make the experiments pop out more without alienating them. So, let’s look at a handful of shreddy blues licks that you can throw down at the next local blues jam without (hopefully) drawing the blues purist’s wrath upon you.
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Spoiler: Yes, they can. Focusing intently on short rhythmic figures will up your picking game immensely.

Beginner

Intermediate

• Develop better right-hand technique.

• Learn how frequent rests can help you prevent injury.

• Understand how to isolate and improve picking weaknesses.

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Whether you’re a lead player looking add some fast-picked lines to your vocabulary or a metal player who wants to play faster riffs, you’ll need a solid foundation to tackle the heavy-duty alternate picking that’s needed. It’s always good to have that technical headroom to express yourself without hitting the ceiling too quickly. In this lesson, we’ll look at how “speed bursts” can help you with short- and long-term technique goals.

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Everything you'll need to know to create lines in the style of Frank Gamble, Jason Becker, and Yngwie.

Advanced

Beginner

  • Learn to use a rest stroke.
  • Map out triads on the top three strings.
  • Create lines in the style of Frank Gamble, Jason Becker, and Yngwie.
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Sweep picking allows us to play licks that normally would be extremely difficult, if not impossible. In a nutshell, sweep picking is playing across several strings with a single, fluid pick stroke. Sounds simple, right? Well, it's important to focus on keeping the movement fluid and not execute separate pick strokes in the same direction—and that's what this lesson will help with.

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Sometimes you just need to shred.

Advanced

Beginner

·Learn how to tighten up your technique.

·Understand how to move up the neck through the pentatonic shapes.

·Develop a rapid-fire picking attack.

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Is the pentatonic scale the most popular? Maybe. It certainly is one of the more overused scales. I've found one of the keys to building speed and technique is to use simple, repeating patterns. Aside from the physical benefits, these licks give something for the listener to lock into during a solo. This lesson is all about taking inspiration from Hammett, Zakk, Jake E. Lee, Kotzen, Howe, and others. Let's dig in.

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