Want to cut a great bass track in the studio? Bring your own headphones—ones you always use that provide a comfortable fit and consistent sound. Photo by Andy Ellis


Want to cut a great bass track in the studio? Bring your own headphones—ones you always use that provide a comfortable fit and consistent sound. Photo by Andy Ellis

As bassists, the fate of where our beloved lines land in the mix depends on a number of things. Over the years, I’ve been able to eliminate most of the concerns I used to carry around with me—concerns I’d have from the second the session ended until I heard the final record weeks or months later. I hope these tips can help you avoid those periods of anxiety and be useful to you on your quest for studio bliss.

Know Your Gear
Whatever you do, don’t ever experiment the day of the session. Trying out a new direct box (DI), amp, compressor, or effect 30 minutes before the start of a session is a recipe for disaster. If you have a new piece of gear you’re itching to use, try to get into the studio the evening before the session and test it out.

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