banditos

“Each of us brings something different to the band,” says Banditos’ Jeffery Salter (far left).
Photo by Albert Kuhne

He loves Roy and Chet. He studied jazz and classical guitar. He’s played in thrash and punk bands. He even builds his own guitars. And his sextet has just released one of the most compelling roots-rock albums of the year.

There’s no shortage of artists having a go at classic Americana, roots, and country music, but few do as impressive a job of revitalizing the tried-and-true as Banditos. Now based in Nashville, the group emerged in Birmingham, Alabama, and their eponymous debut LP is a soulful celebration of all that is great about traditional country music served up with a rock ’n’ roll twist. While successfully avoiding the Dixie-rock clichés many young country acts rely on, Banditos sound simultaneously familiar and fresh. Punctuated by fiery Tele licks and tasteful flourishes of lap steel, their music also boasts sophisticated arrangements by lead guitarist Jeffery Salter, who studied jazz and classical guitar in college.

When Salter isn’t on the road with Banditos, he’s busy building unique, Fender-inspired guitars under the name Pyrose Wood Works. His instruments feature premium parts and killer wood-burned decorations, and he plays them exclusively—both in the studio and on tour.

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Guitar store staff have better things to do than clean your instrument, so a well-loved but unsoiled 6-string like this is going to command a higher trade-in value than one that comes in covered in years of residue.

Believe it or not, you can boost the value of your instrument by making everyone's life a little easier … and cleaner!

There's an overwhelming amount of activity in the guitar market these days, and the sheer amount of demand has left some manufacturers struggling to keep up. But rather than wait around for stores to re-stock, more and more customers are shopping for used and vintage guitars. You might wonder, where do all those used guitars come from?

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How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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