future rock

Rethink your approach to pentatonic shapes by pushing the limits of your picking.

Advanced

Beginner

• Visualize different string groupings for pentatonic scales.
• Understand the basics of economy picking.
• Learn how to create lines in the style of Eric Johnson, Shawn Lane, and Joe Bonamassa.

{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 11618 site_id=20368559 original_filename="FutureRock-Mar19.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/11618/FutureRock-Mar19.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 11618, u'media_html': u'FutureRock-Mar19.pdf'}

When I first heard about economy picking, the simplicity intrigued me. The concept is relatively straightforward: After a downstroke, if you're moving to a higher string, you make another downstroke. If you travel to a lower string, that requires an upstroke. Many beginners often intuitively do this. It wasn't until a bit later that I adopted a regimen of strict alternate picking for scales and sweep picking for arpeggios. But the idea of economy picking echoed in my mind. Wouldn't it be wonderful to have one picking style that could fluidly transition from arpeggios to scales? As time went on, I explored players like Django Reinhardt, Frank Gambale, and George Bellas, and economy picking naturally found its way into more of my technique.

Read More Show less

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12854 site_id=20368559 original_filename="Britpop-Dec21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12854/Britpop-Dec21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12854, u'media_html': u'Britpop-Dec21.pdf'}

When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

Read More Show less
John 5 on How He Gets Old-School Tones from His Metal-Friendly Tele | The Big 5

Plus, find out which guitar hero the Rob Zombie sideman “begs and pleads” with you to listen to.

Read More Show less
x