neck joint

Sometimes a guitar’s bolt-on neck needs a shim. Find out why and learn how to shim a neck the right way.

Recently a client brought an older Fender Telecaster into the shop for a setup. The action was really high, but the saddles had run out of adjustment and couldn't drop any lower. After careful inspection, I determined that the neck needed a shim to fix the problem. Fortunately, shimming a bolt-on neck isn't too hard. In fact, if you're handy with basic tools you can do this yourself, but you need to understand the process and know what mistakes to avoid. Let's investigate.

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Julien Baker on the Pedal That “Saved My Butt!” & Heroes Yvette Young & Jann Wasner | The Big 5

Plus, hear why her butterscotch Tele is still her go-to guitar.

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Photo 1

All photos courtesy SINGLECOIL (www.singlecoil.com)

We're getting close to the end of our journey. We've aged most of the metal parts on our project guitar, so now let's take care of the output jack, knobs, back plate, and pickguard.

Hello and welcome back to Mod Garage. This month, we'll continue with the aging process of our Harley Benton DC-Junior project guitar (which is a copy of a 1958 Les Paul Junior Double Cut), taking a closer look at the pickguard while aging the rest of the hardware discussed in the last part of this series ["DIY Relic'ing: Harley Benton DC-Junior Electronics"]. If you need a refresher on our aging process for hardware, refer back to "DIY Relic'ing: Break the Shine" for guidance. You can see the parts we'll be discussing today in their "finished" form, aka relic'd, in Photo 1.

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