There's a lot of musical gold inside the scales.

Intermediate

Intermediate

• Develop a deeper improvisational vocabulary.

• Combine pentatonic scales to create new colors.

• Understand the beauty of diatonic harmony.
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Improvising over one chord for long stretches of time can be a musician's best friend or worst nightmare. With no harmonic variation, we are left to generate interest through our lines, phrasing, and creativity. When I started learning to improvise, a minor 7 chord and a Dorian mode were the only sounds that I wanted to hear at the time. I found it tremendously helpful to have the harmony stay in one spot while I mined for new ideas to play. Playing over a static chord was crucial in developing my sense of time and phrasing.

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Photo by Brett Jordan on Unsplash

Expand your playing by limiting your options.

Intermediate

Intermediate

  • Learn how to "trick" yourself into creativity.
  • Understand how to focus on a single rhythmic motif through a progression.
  • Develop a better sense of articulation, time, and phrasing.
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Improvisation is one of the great joys in music that celebrates spontaneity and self-expression. It gives us a chance to explore our instrument and what we naturally hear and feel in an open format. Limitations help challenge us to improvise inside specific parameters and, as a result, can break us out of our typical musical vocabulary.

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A hands-on look at the staccato stylings of Catfish Collins, Bruno Speight, Jimmy Nolen, and others.

Intermediate

Intermediate

• Learn how to improve your sense of internal time.
• Develop groovy parts in the style of Catfish Collins and David Williams.
• Understand how to fit within a rhythm section.

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The vast amount of research out there on right-hand technique and its application to lead-guitar pyrotechnics over the last 40 years is staggering, and it's a fair wager that observing rhythm guitar to a similar degree would produce interesting finds. However, in my many years as a guitarist I've been surprised by the lack of information available in regard to rhythm playing. Learning my favorite funk and R&B parts got me to a place where I could play rhythm confidently in many different situations, but something always felt a little "off" with the way I was approaching it technically.

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