A feature-filled pitch-shifting delay meant for maximum weirding.

Wide-ranging and unique functionality. Envelope settings and momentary switches lend extreme interactivity.

Steep learning curve. Stereo input/output is only via TRS stereo cable.

$299

Red Panda Raster 2
redpandalab.com

4.5
4.5
4
4

You could call the Raster 2 a delay pedal with a pitch shifter and modulation, but that would set up inaccurate expectations about the pedal’s sound and function. Instead, like many modern algorithm-driven glitch pedals, the Raster provides a way of interacting with sound. In that way, the Raster 2 is as much synth as tone augmenter.

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Bilt and Milkman collaborate on a tweed Deluxe-style amp that adds tone options and enticing styling.

Responsive with an impressively wide range of tones. Bass knob is a welcome addition. Super sleek. Successfully sags at high volumes.

Only available to Bilt owners. Expensive. Cabinet finish might not hold up to heavy gigging.

$2,999 base price (available as add-on to Bilt order, or to current Bilt owners)

5
5
5
4

There’s a good chance your first electric guitar came in a packaged set with an amp, case, cable, some picks, a tuner, and maybe even an instruction book. Mine did—and I still remember the excitement I felt while opening it on that fateful Christmas morning. The Bilt Starter Pack is a chic, high-end, customized guitar/amp combo package designed to re-capture that thrill for players with fancier tastes. And while the Starter Pack isn’t exactly designed for budget-conscious newbies, unless you already own a Bilt guitar, it’s the only way to get your hands on the new Bilt Amp.

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An octave/fuzz/modulation combo platter fit for freaks of all stripes.

Wide variety of wacky and practical tones on hand. Intuitive controls. Effective expression pedal control.

Extreme settings might be dangerous to your speakers.

$199

MXR Poly Blue Octave
jimdunlop.com

4.5
4
4
4.5

MXR’s Blue Box has always been an outlier on the octave-pedal scene. One of the company’s earliest offerings, it drops a guitar signal by two octaves and blasts it with fuzz. Despite remaining active in the MXR stable throughout much of its history, the Blue Box is mostly celebrated in the deepest pedal-nerd hang sessions once all the classic fuzz, overdrive, and delay pedals have been discussed and things get weird.

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It’s the ’80s in a box—just add hair spray.

A portable, user-friendly path to tri-stereo chorus sounds. Presets make it easy to find ’80s guitar tones. Good analog BBD-style chorus tones. Sensitive controls allow for refined tweaking.

Dual-control knobs make it difficult to visualize settings.

$299

Eventide TriceraChorus
eventideaudio.com

5
4
4
4

The 1980s were a decade of big hair, big amps, and big guitar tones. But while those stacks of cabinets certainly made things louder, behind-the-scenes rackmount chorus and in particular, the tri-stereo chorus units available under various names such as Dyno-My-Piano, Dynotronics, and Songbird, did a lot to make ’80s guitar sound bigger still. Once these rackmount units reached the rigs of guitarists such as Michael Landau and Steve Lukather, pop radio didn’t stand a chance.

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