DiMarzio to Release Steve Vai Gravity Storm Pickups

The Gravity Storm is the next step in Steve Vai’s pickup evolution.

Staten Island, NY (July 31, 2012) – DiMarzio, Inc. announced it will release two new Gravity Storm humbucking pickups for electric guitars in mid-August. The Gravity Storm Neck and Bridge Model pickups were designed for Steve Vai. The pickups are named after a song on his new CD, Steve Vai: The Story of Light, that will be released on August 14, 2012 by Vai’s Favored Nations label.

The Gravity Storm is the next step in Steve Vai’s pickup evolution. Vai used to speak of pickup sounds in terms of specific frequency responses, but now he describes them in terms of flavors and textures. The flavor of The Gravity Storm Neck Model (DP252) is sweet and warm, but the texture has an edge to it. The combination of fat neck position tone with harmonics gives the Gravity Storm Neck Model an unusual throaty quality that sounds like a cross between a humbucker and a single-coil.

Steve described the sound he wanted from his new Gravity Storm Bridge Model (DP253) pickup as “a thundering cloud of ice cream.” It is very much a plug and play pickup – it does not require a lot of tweaking to get a great sound. Because the highs are very fat, it is possible to increase treble response on one’s amp without losing tone and sustain on the high frets.

DiMarzio’s new Gravity Storm Neck and Bridge Model pickups are made in the U.S.A. and will be available August 15, 2012 from guitarcenter.com and musiciansfriend.com. They will go on sale from all DiMarzio dealers on September 17, 2012. Suggested List Price for each pickup is $115.

For more information:
www.dimarzio.com

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