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We live in a blessed age for lovers of boutique pedals. Every other day a company shows up online with a bucket (brigade?) of analog effects claiming to be the

We live in a blessed age for lovers of boutique pedals. Every other day a company shows up online with a bucket (brigade?) of analog effects claiming to be the new paragons of tone. Brad Jeter’s story is typical: a guitarist begins tinkering with pedals seeking a sound he can’t find in the existing models. (The extra “t” in the company name is so people don’t mispronounce it “jeeter”). Thousands of hours later, he reproduces the elusive tone in his head. Unleashing it on the guitar world, he finds that many agree with his definition of sonic excellence—success! Customers express wants and needs of their own, leading him to other models and other effects. Jetter now offers six overdrive pedals, catering to a wide variety of distortion tastes. Here we look at two of his grit monsters, as well as his unique entry into the Uni-Vibe sweepstakes.

I tested the pedals with a Fernandes Strat fitted with DiMarzio Virtual Vintage pickups, a Burns Steer, a Hanson Chicagoan with mini-humbuckers, and a Danelectro Pro-1, into an Orange Tiny Terror head and a ZT Lunchbox amp.

Gain Stage Green


Download Example 1

Green Clean: First you hear the pedal off through the Orange Tiny Terror. From the second time through the lick the pedal is on.

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Can an entry-level modeler hang with the big dogs?

Excellent interface. Very portable. Nice modulation tones.

Some subpar low-gain dirt sounds. Could be a little more rugged.

$399

HeadRush MX5
headrushfx.com

3.5
4
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4.5

The allure of portability and sonic consistency has become too much to ignore for some guitarists, making smaller digital modelers more appealing than ever.

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Emily Wolfe lets loose, with an Epiphone Sheraton around her shoulders. Her signature Sheraton Stealth was released in 2021. "The guitar is the perfect frequency range for my soul," she says.

Photo by Brittany Durdin

The rising guitar star blends classic and stoner rock, Motown, and more influences with modern pop flourishes in songs replete with fat, fuzzy, fizzy tones from her new Epiphone Sheraton signature.

For so many artists, the return of live shows means the return of the thrill of performing, much-needed income, and, in a way, purpose. The third definitely goes for guitarist Emily Wolfe, who, when asked about her goals, immediately responds, "I just want to play arenas every night for the rest of my life. When I go up there, something could hit me at any point—an emotion that I felt 10 years ago could come out in a bend on the low E."

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