from the lab

We’re starting with our favorite amp as the basis for our tone, then we’re using a second amp to blend in with the first, creating our composite signal.

It’s been a month – have you acquired that second amp? Picking up from my last article, in the most basic setup, we’re starting with our favorite amp as the basis for our tone. Then we’re using a second amp to blend in with the first to create our composite signal. For the sake of simplicity and building our knowledge one step at a time, we’ll limit this article to talking about using only two amps.

Achieving independent control of each amp is the next step in the two-amp setup. After the signal split, we could put a volume pedal inline to one or both of the amps. We can now blend the amps for different flavors beyond just two straight amps. Also, odds are that at least one of the amps has channel switching. That adds a whole additional layer of possibilities just from two amps, a volume pedal or two, and an A-B-Y box.

What about effects? The wet/dry setup is very effective. We can use the second amp to color and tone-shape the primary amp. Rather than muddy up that great amp we spent all of that money on, we can color and affect the second amp, leaving the first amp’s tone and punch untouched. The primary amp will come roaring through surrounded by, but not masked by, the tone and effects of the second amp. Adding a multi-fx unit with MIDI or channel switching controls in the effects loop of one or both of the amps gives us even more sonic combinations and control than any single amp could ever achieve. In addition to simply adding effects, many of the current effects units on the market today have a CC (Continuous Controller) input that would expand your tonal capabilities even further.


So many of us get locked in the mind set of getting that one "great" amp that''s going to do it all for us, when in fact, sometimes it takes a team effort.

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First of all, in the spirit of the new year, I’d like you to think about the way you think about things. No, really … think!

Greetings Premier Guitar readers! I am honored to be writing this for you and for having the invitation to do so from Trent Salter, the publisher of Premier Guitar. These little “lectures” will be written by some of the Creation Audio Labs staff. It is our sincere hope that we can be of service to you by providing helpful information and possibly answering a few questions in this column … we’ll certainly do our best!

First of all, in the spirit of the new year, I’d like you to think about the way you think about things. No, really … think! We have just entered a new year in a time when everything is moving extremely fast. We have more opportunities now than we have ever had at any other time in history, for both great things and for disaster. Technology has taken us to places further than old Leo, Les, and Jim M. could have imagined “back in the day.” The way we think about things should be changing as well.

The way you think about the way you play your instrument matters. The way you think about the way you sound matters. The way you think (or not!) about the proper use of your gear matters. The way you think about people matters. The way you think about you matters! Does that make sense? All things matter! Your attitude. Your intentions. The way you live life. The way you think. All of it.

Okay, okay, so what’s the point, and what has this to do with playing guitars? The point is that one’s success or failure in any endeavor is primarily up to that individual. If you think you can … you can! If you think you can’t, then you’re right, you can’t. It’s that simple. So why not straighten out that attitude, posture, and intention, and pick up that guitar and play (and not just like yesterday!)?

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