hal leonard

The updated version includes profiles of more than 20 contemporary pedal builders.

Montclair, NJ (December 4, 2013) -- Guitar Effects Pedals: The Practical Handbook opens up the world of effects pedals, vintage and new alike, for the guitarist. Dave Hunter explores the complexities of the booming pedal market. He starts with the earliest guitar effects – tube amp overdrive, spring reverb, manual vibrato, and tremolo – and takes the reader through to the latest Mastortions, Tremvelopes, Giggities, and Euphorias.

Meeting the great pedal designers, Hunter asks some searching questions. What were Jimi Hendrix’s pedal secrets? Is ‘true bypass’ a good thing or not? Can your choice of battery make a difference to your sound? Are vintage components really better? Why does veteran pedal guru Roger Mayer not think much of the modern ‘boutique’ pedal designs? How did the Big Muff Pi and the Voodoo Lab Proctavia get their intriguing names?

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Guitar store staff have better things to do than clean your instrument, so a well-loved but unsoiled 6-string like this is going to command a higher trade-in value than one that comes in covered in years of residue.

Believe it or not, you can boost the value of your instrument by making everyone's life a little easier … and cleaner!

There's an overwhelming amount of activity in the guitar market these days, and the sheer amount of demand has left some manufacturers struggling to keep up. But rather than wait around for stores to re-stock, more and more customers are shopping for used and vintage guitars. You might wonder, where do all those used guitars come from?

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How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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