Backbeat Books to Publish "Guitar Effects Pedals: The Practical Handbook"

The updated version includes profiles of more than 20 contemporary pedal builders.

Montclair, NJ (December 4, 2013) -- Guitar Effects Pedals: The Practical Handbook opens up the world of effects pedals, vintage and new alike, for the guitarist. Dave Hunter explores the complexities of the booming pedal market. He starts with the earliest guitar effects – tube amp overdrive, spring reverb, manual vibrato, and tremolo – and takes the reader through to the latest Mastortions, Tremvelopes, Giggities, and Euphorias.

Meeting the great pedal designers, Hunter asks some searching questions. What were Jimi Hendrix’s pedal secrets? Is ‘true bypass’ a good thing or not? Can your choice of battery make a difference to your sound? Are vintage components really better? Why does veteran pedal guru Roger Mayer not think much of the modern ‘boutique’ pedal designs? How did the Big Muff Pi and the Voodoo Lab Proctavia get their intriguing names?

Most electric guitarists consider effects pedals central to their sound, whether they want to enhance the natural qualities of the instrument and amp or create something more wild and colorful. Guitar Effects Pedals: The Practical Handbook gives them everything to understand and enjoy their pedals – old and new, simple and sophisticated. The book explores the history of different effects pedals, what each type of effect does and how it does it, and the best ways in which to use and combine effects. Included are exclusive author interviews with a dozen leading pedal makers and designers, plus a cover-mounted CD with nearly 100 recorded sound samples of effects pedals, both popular and obscure. This updated edition includes the addition of profiles of more than 20 other contemporary makers, 50 percent more manufacturer interviews, and revisions to the original text.

This is the only book on the market that includes all of these important elements in the examination of effects pedals – a comprehensive history of the art; profiles on both vintage and contemporary (including “boutique”) units; and expert advice on all aspects of using these tools. For any serious player interested in honing the perfect tone the right way, this is the go-to reference.

For more information:
Backbeat Books

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