recording dojo

How to Reamp Your Guitar | Recording Dojo

This well-established, simple technique opens up a new world of sonic possibilities.

[Originally published February 14, 2022]
Welcome to another Dojo! This time I’m going to show you how to reamp your guitar and explore some creative ways you can re-amps other tracks as well (soft synths, vocals, drums, etc.). In my earlier column “Why Guitarists Shouldn’t Diss DIs,” I mentioned the benefits of using a DI for creative recording. If you have a DI box, dust it off! You’ll need it when I show you how to get more out of your DI-recorded guitar and bass tracks by reamping them into your pedals and amps to capture new perspectives and even add some new reverberant spaces. Tighten up your belts, the Dojo is now open.

Read More Show less

Fig. 1

Here's how to make your mono-tracked guitar solos—and more—sound larger than life.

Welcome back to the Dojo! This month I'm going to explain the Haas effect and how to use it on exposed parts (like your solo) and get it sounding wider than your speakers! I call it the "Haas Solo Effect"—a pun in tribute to my lifelong love of Star Wars. Tighten up your belts, we're going to throw around galactic-size audio. The Dojo is now open.

Read More Show less

Fig. 1

Bryan Clark shares pearls about deploying multiband compressors as sonic superglue—a sequel to last month's pointers for dynamic EQs.

Welcome back, everyone. Last time, I shed some light on using a dynamic EQ rather than a multiband compressor. There are many similarities on the surface, but people use them interchangeably with brazen ignorance of what they're designed to do. If you ever have to replace a bolt (say, from your amp chassis or a rackmounted piece of gear), you measure the diameter and length of the bolt, head down to your local hardware store, buy a replacement, and drive home. Only, after several failed attempts to replace the bolt, you might discover that you didn't get the right thread count and it will not screw in under any circumstances. What I'm saying is: Attention to detail matters. Especially in audio, where the difference between a good mix and a great one lies in your choosing the right tool for the job. The Dojo is now open, so let's begin.

Read More Show less
x