Author: Mark John Sternal $24.95 mjspublications.com Maybe this is stating the obvious, but Americans are always looking for a quick fix. If that weren’t true, I wouldn’t be getting


Total Scales Techniques and ApplicationsAuthor: Mark John Sternal
$24.95
mjspublications.com


Maybe this is stating the obvious, but Americans are always looking for a quick fix. If that weren’t true, I wouldn’t be getting numerous emails each day offering to get rid of my spare tire and consolidate my debts overnight. Sadly, that same desire for the “quick fix” often pervades the six-string world – there are numerous books and DVDs flooding the market, promising to turn any fumbling teenager into a bona fide rockstar with just a few minutes a day. Where’s the dedication to settle in for the long haul?

If you’re tired of the quick fix, there’s now a better way. Guitarists who aren’t afraid to put some honest-to-God elbow grease into their chops will want to pick up a copy of Total Scales Techniques and Applications. In one of the most thorough books I’ve seen, Total Scales takes you from the basics – musical notation and tuning your guitar – all the way to complex fretting hand techniques and truly exotic scales.

Of course, there’s a catch. After each example given (and there are plenty), whether it’s covering two-string exercises or ghost bends, the book dutifully instructs you to, “apply this to every scale position, technique, application and rhythm in this book.” Yeah, you read that right. There’s a lot of ground to cover, and it can be slow going at times, but there’s no doubt that if you dedicate yourself, you’ll come out the other side a completely different player.

Even for those less inclined to spend hours each night with a book, there’s plenty to be learned here, from the detailed scale charts to the finger-testing exercises. Total Scales would make a good addition to any guitarist’s library, as both a valuable reference and a constant reminder to turn off the television and practice.
Pop Evil’s Nick Fuelling on Why James Hetfield Is “the Man”

Meanwhile, coguitarist Dave Grahs—the band’s resident punk rocker—reveals a surprisingly roots-y side.

See a sampling of picks used by famous guitarists over the years.

Marty Stuart

Submit your own artist pick collections to rebecca@premierguitar.com for inclusion in a future gallery.

Luthier Dave Helmer shows you how to cure buzzy strings, bad intonation, gnarly frets, high action, and other common troubles with off-the-shelf axes.

Guitars are the best. We love them. It’s fun to fall in love with a guitar at a store, buy it, and proudly bring it home. But we’ve all been there … where after a month that new guitar is just not playing as good as it was before. As guitar players, we know what feels good and what feels bad when it comes to playability. Maybe you have setup preferences that you like on all your guitars, or maybe you want to experiment with changes to your setup?

Read MoreShow less
x