A look into the history of Orange Amps, Orange Records, and Orange Studios and the landmark products along the way.

"Orange moved production to Bexleyheth in Kent, UK in 1973. The shop was just down the road from the Rotosound facility, and it was the company's first production line. Factory Manager Mick Dines says, ""We employed local people in Bexleyheath to assemble the amplifiers - the output being about one amp per worker a day."" The new shop marked a larger scale operation, with the ability to load a forty-foot container headed to America. Pictured: Steve, John, Barry, Mary, Mick, Margot, Jan, Viv, Hillary (hidden), Olive, Pete, Chris, Michael, John, and Bob."

To read more from The Book of Orange, check out our exclusive excerpt!

This rare English Tonemaster was made circa 1957.

The Valco-produced English Tonemaster is a rare, lap-steel-inspired gem from the 1950s—when genres and guitar design were fluid.

The 1950s were a peculiar time for the electric guitar. Innovators, designers, and tinkerers were pushing the boundaries of the instrument, while musicians were experimenting with various playing techniques and sounds. There was an evolution of sorts (or de-evolution, depending on your slant) from solidbody “sit-down” guitars, like pedal and lap steels, to “stand-up” or “upright” solidbody electrics. If you look at an early Fender catalog—let’s say from 1953—you’ll see the Telecaster (and Esquire), the Precision Bass, and then a whole bunch of steel guitars. There was a shift underway, and many manufacturers began to blur the lines of what a guitar should look, sound, and play like.

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PRS Guitars and John Mayer officially announce the PRS SE Silver Sky, an affordable version of the original with PRS trademark bird inlays and three single-coil pickups.

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