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Lollar Pickups Releases Thunderbird-Style Replacement Pickup

Lollar Pickups Releases Thunderbird-Style Replacement Pickup

Lollar wound a slightly hotter bridge pickup for better balance, and gave them a very quick wax potting to keep the pickup cover from being overly microphonic and to ensure the coils don’t become more microphonic over time.

Vashon Island, WA (September 15, 2011) -- Lollar pickups announce the release of their Thunderbird-style replacement pickup. Jason Lollar, the company’s founder, explained, “Like all of the reproduction pickups we make, I had to first find a good working sample of an original 1964 Thunderbird bass pickup to use as a reference. For my version, I had the magnets, bobbins, steel baseplates and pickup covers made from scratch. The resulting pickup is essentially the same as the originals with a few improvements. I wound a slightly hotter bridge pickup for better balance, and gave them a very quick wax potting to keep the pickup cover from being overly microphonic and to ensure the coils don’t become more microphonic over time. They use Alnico 5 bar magnets. Nickel is the standard original cover finish, and we also have chrome and gold available in limited quantities. We offer optional ¼” tall black pickup surrounds and shims for retrofitting into the Epiphone basses with the rectangular plastic pickups."

For more information:
Lollar Pickups

Source: Press Release
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