John Cruz Unveils the Master-Built Crossville Series

Legendary luthier John Cruz announces two new guitars featuring custom pickups and lacquer-tinted headstocks.


The Crossville Series includes two models incorporating the best of all worlds – the Crossville ST “S”-Style guitar and the Crossville TL “T”-Style guitar. Each player-centric model is available with a wide array of options and finishes, clear or matching lacquer-tinted headstocks, four levels of Cruz’s famous aging and distressed conditioning (Pristine, Time Capsule, Whole Lotta Playing, Battle Axe), and custom hard-shell cases.

Crossville ST guitars are available with light hand-select alder, mahogany or swamp ash bodies; large “C”-shape, quartersawn, 25.5”-scale length maple necks with a 12”-radius maple cap or rosewood fingerboard (sans “skunk stripe”), 21 6100 jumbo frets without tangs (reducing fret sprout), Graph Tech
1 11/16” nut and Gotoh staggered SD91 tuners (eliminating string trees). In addition, Crossville ST guitars include John Cruz Custom Design pickups, Gotoh 510TS-SF2 bridges with Highwood compensated saddles, a five-way switch, Dunlop volume and tone pots, and D’Addario NYXL .10 - .49 strings.

Crossville TL guitars also feature light alder, mahogany or swamp ash bodies; large “C”-shape quartersawn 25.5”-scale length maple necks with a 12”-radius maple cap or rosewood fingerboard, 21 6100 jumbo frets without tangs, Graph Tech 1 11/16” nut and Gotoh staggered SD91 tuners. In addition, Crossville TL guitars include John Cruz Custom Design pickups, Gotoh Ti-TC1S with Titanium compensated saddles, a three-way switch, Dunlop volume and tone pots, and D’Addario NYXL .10 - .49 strings.

John Cruz Custom Guitars instruments can be found at authorized dealers. For more information and a list of dealers, go to www.johncruzcustomguitars.

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