tc electronic INFINITE Sample Sustainer

INFINITE is a sustainer pedal designed to give guitarists the ability to create audible snapshots and features a built-in FX loop for patching effects.


INFINITE is intended for guitarists to capture and sustain a moment in audio, allowing them to build soundscapes and captivating moods whenever and wherever between now and forever. Notes and chords can be stacked and set to fade out gradually – or Infinity mode can be enabled for endless sustain.

When using the sustain pedal on an acoustic piano, there is a natural sense of reverberation, and similarly, an integral element of ambient guitar soundscapes is often associated with generous lashings of reverb and/or modulation effects. INFINITE sports a comprehensive reverb engine and modulation block to unite functionality and expressiveness.

“I am very excited about our first sustainer pedal ever, which opens creative spaces ready for exploration and experimentation. Imagine the sounds you could create if you had infinite time on your hands. Well, we can’t give you infinite time, unfortunately, but we’re very happy to offer endless amounts of sustained layers right at the tips of your toes. I am also very pleased to share that the integrated reverb is based on the exact same algorithm found in our highly acclaimed Hall of Fame Reverb pedal. Nothing is too good for soundscapes INFINITE-style,” says Paul Robert Scott, Product Manager.

INFINITE can be used in Latching or Momentary mode and has a built-in FX Loop for patching even more effects into the sustained part of the signal. INFINITE comes with three TonePrint slots for beaming artist TonePrints, or ones that have been created and customized by the user in our free TonePrint App and editor.

INFINITE SAMPLE SUSTAINER - Official Product Video

Designed in TC Electronic's headquarters in Denmark.
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