Gig-fx announces the second generation of their Megawah and Chopper effects

Waltham, MA (May 25, 2008) -- Gig-fx has announced the launch of the second generation of their Megawah and Chopper at this year''s upcoming Summer NAMM.

Megawah, second generation

The new Megawah has a warmed up high-end response while maintaining the signature wide sweep range and funky low end. Improvements have also been made to the mechanics of the pedal allowing smoother action and user-adjustable pedal resistance.

The pedal uses optical switching and is noiselessly by-passed when the pedal is all the way back. Gig-fx has introduced a user-adjustable delay so that when sweeping the pedal, the unit does not turn off accidentally.

The Megawah has been picked up by a hot list of creative guitarists such as Johnny Hiland, Nick McCabe (The Verve), Richard Fortus (Guns and Roses), Mike Scott (Justin Timberlake/Prince) and others.

Being the only stereo wah pedal out there, keyboard players are also rapidly adopting the pedal including Jordan Rudess (Dream Theater), John "JT" Thomas (Bruce Hornsby) and Neal Evans (Soulive) to name but a few.

Chopper, second generation

Aimed at the writing and gigging musician, the Chopper allows live panning and chopping and can generate both classic and innovative tremolo and rhythmic patterns.The Chopper has been picked up by a hot list of creative artists such as Adam Jones of Tool, Adrian Belew (King Crimson), Ben Curtis (Secret Machines), Joe Barresi (producer - Tool, Anthrax, Weezer, Skunk Anansie), Juan Alderete (The Mars Volta), Mick Thomson (Slipknot), Mike Scott (Justin Timberlake / Prince), Nick McCabe (The Verve), and Prince, to name but a few.

The new Chopper also has improved tremolo / pan depth control, flush-mounted power jack for easier and more reliable connections, and access through the base of the pedal to the optical switch adjustment if needed.

Both pedals feature improved bypass circuitry that gig-fx claims is superior to a true bypass in terms of preserving the instrument signal in cables (the company says they will soon be releasing test data and a video to support that claim). Pricing information was not available at this time.

For more information, visit gig-fx.com.

Remember, Summer NAMM is from June 20-22, and we''ll be there bringing you ongoing coverage of everything new.

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