bandmaster

The Bandmaster Reverb head was built from 1968 to 1980 and has enough grille-room to install a pair of 8" speakers—a popular mod.

An introduction to Fender's classic amp heads of the '60s and '70s.

Fender's black-panel piggyback amps are not as widely known as the combos that every guitar player on this planet has either seen, heard, or played. They have lost appeal in a time when practicality and economy are guiding amp selection for most of us. Thanks to PA and monitor solutions, we no longer need big, powerful amps to fill rooms and stages. But, as we know, tone and size are related. So, let's look back at the great Fender piggybacks, from an era before the world needed to be so efficient and compact.

Read More Show less

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
{u'media': u'[rebelmouse-document-pdf 12793 site_id=20368559 original_filename="DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf"]', u'file_original_url': u'https://roar-assets-auto.rbl.ms/documents/12793/DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf', u'type': u'pdf', u'id': 12793, u'media_html': u'DeepPockets-Nov21.pdf'}
Playing in the pocket is the most important thing in music. Just think about how we talk about great music: It's "grooving" or "swinging" or "rocking." Nobody ever says, "I really enjoyed their use of inverted suspended triads," or "their application of large-interval pentatonic sequences was fascinating." So, whether you're playing live or recording, time is everyone's responsibility, and you must develop your ability to play in the pocket.
Read More Show less
Julien Baker on the Pedal That “Saved My Butt!” & Heroes Yvette Young & Jann Wasner | The Big 5

Plus, hear why her butterscotch Tele is still her go-to guitar.

Read More Show less
x