jetter

The Jetter Red Square delivers two unique voices that evoke American- and British-style tones in a practical, powerful, and great-sounding little box.

Pedals that claim to cover vintage overdrive from both sides of the Atlantic are about a dime a dozen these days. The appeal is obvious, of course—who wouldn’t want to be able to move from the sound of a cranked Deluxe to a Marshall plexi with the flip of a switch? But it’s not an easy trick. The range in dynamics and tones between those two worlds might be as wide as the old Pond itself.

Jetter Effects’ new Red Square makes no claims on precisely nailing the sounds of those revered classics, but it uses the tones of the company’s Red Shift and Helium as a jumping-off point to deliver two unique voices that evoke American- and British-style tones in a practical, powerful, and great-sounding little box.

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You could WIN a Greenhouse Effects Deity in This week's All-new giveaway! Ends December 15, 2021.

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Sam Fender shares a moment with his saxophonist and childhood friend, Johnny "Blue Hat" Davis, at London's O2 Brixton Academy in September 2021.

Photo by Linda Brindley

The British songwriter traversed the bleak thoroughfares of his past while writing his autobiographical sophomore album, Seventeen Going Under—a tale of growing up down-and-out, set to an epic chorus of Jazzmasters and soaring sax.

British songwriter Sam Fender hails from North Shields, England, an industrial coastal port town near the North Sea, about eight miles northeast of Newcastle upon Tyne. Fender grew up in this small village, which he calls "a drinking town with a fishing problem." He lived there with his mother on a council estate, a type of British public housing. This is the mise-en-scène for Sam Fender's coming-of-age autobiographical new album, Seventeen Going Under. On the album's cover, a photograph shows Sam sitting on a brick stoop.

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