recording

LUFS offers three different readings, with LUFS long-term, or integrated, being the one digital streaming platforms are paying the most attention to.

Streaming platforms each have their own volume standards for uploaded audio, and if you don’t cater your mixes to each, you risk losing some dynamic range.

Here’s the scenario: You’ve finished your latest masterpiece, and now it’s time to start considering how your mixes and their loudness levels will be perceived across all digital platforms (Apple Music, Spotify, Amazon, etc.). In addition, you might also make sure your music adheres to the strict audio broadcast standards used in film, TV, podcasts, video games, and immersive audio formats like Dolby Atmos.

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At his legendary Sun Records studio, producer Sam Phillips recorded tracks that formed the earliest library of rock ’n’ roll music. He cut seminal records with Howlin’ Wolf, Jerry Lee Lewis, Johnny Cash, and the king himself, Elvis Presley.

Here’s a breakdown of classic Sun Records recording methods, and a brief guide to matching them in your own studio.

Greetings and welcome to another Dojo. Last month I showed you how to get some early-Beatles vibe into your mixes. This time, I’d like to turn the clock back a bit earlier, put the ragtop down, throttle the Chevy small-block V8 and burn rubber back to the cradle of American rock ’n’ roll—Memphis, Tennessee. Tighten up your (seat) belts, the Dojo is now open.

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If you’ve ever wanted to make your mixes sound more like the Fab Four’s, you can use this guide to do just that.

We’re huge, and I mean H-U-G-E, Beatles fans here at Blackbird (you can guess where the studio’s name comes from). And for this column, I’d like to give you some ways you can add some old-school Beatles sound to your mixes. Tighten up those belts, the Dojo is now open.

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