Black Cat Pedals Announce Mini Trem

The Mini Trem is a classic, ''60s-style tremolo and clean FET boost in one pedal

Foxton, CT (January 9, 2011) -- Black Cat Pedals is pleased to announce their latest product, the Black Cat Mini Trem. After focusing on Custom Shop creations over the past year, the Mini Trem is the first standard production Black Cat pedal to be introduced since the company launched its debut line.

The Black Cat Mini Trem is a dual function tremolo/clean boost in one pedal. Part of the legacy of the original Black Cat line, the new Mini Trem sports some additional features and a spiffy new look.

At the heart of this pedal is a classic, sixties-style tremolo with Speed and Depth controls. The circuit also incorporates a clean FET boost with controls for Boost and Tone. Finally, Black Cat has added a second stomp switch that allows for half-speed/double-speed switching, and an LED that flashes in time with the rate of the tremolo.

The tremolo and clean boost effects can function independently of one another, but the Mini Trem really shines by using the combination of all four controls, which Black Cat says yields the widest variety of tones and timbres available in any stompbox tremolo. The Black Cat Mini Trem lets you "voice" the sound of your tremolo, from a deep and swampy throb to a sharp staccato stutter.

Features:
* Durable powder-coat "Gold Sparkle" finish
* Cool Black glass epoxy PCB with yellow silkscreen
* Metal film resistors and audio grade capacitors
* 3PDT true-bypass switch and Switchcraft jacks
* Uses 2.1mm Boss style power jack, or internal 9V battery
* Hand-wired, Boutique quality, Made in USA
* LED flashes in time to tremolo rate
* Two footswitches - one for On/Off and one for Speed

For more information:
Black Cat Pedals

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