Electro-Harmonix Announces Killswitch Momentary Line Selector

The Killswitch features a Line Selector mode and Kill Mode

Anaheim, CA (January 14, 2011) — Electro-Harmonix introduces the Killswitch, a pedal which provides utilitarian functionality and two distinct modes of operation. In Line Selector mode, the pedal lets the player rapidly switch between its effects loop or a dry signal. In this mode, the scope of the pedal’s use is only limited by the player’s creative vision. It can, for example, be used to quickly switch in the effects loop, thereby introducing a burst of distortion, analog delay induced feedback, ring modulation, etc. It can also be tapped in time with what is being played to bring effects in and out of the signal path rhythmically. This is especially interesting when one of the effects is a delay.

In Kill Mode, the Killswitch can be used to provide convenient instant muting. It can also be used to create interesting stutter effects by turning the instrument’s signal abruptly on and off while bending a note or inducing feedback.

Housed in a solid die-cast package, with a 4.37″ long by 2.37″ wide footprint, the Killswitch is pedalboard ready. It is equipped with a 9V battery and can also be powered by a standard 9.6V/DC200mA AC adapter. The Killswitch is shipping now with a U.S. list price of $60.

For more information:
EHX

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