Owners of amps that were damaged in the Nashville flood can ship their amps to Mercury Magnetics to be inspected and re-varnished for free.

Chatsworth, CA (May 19, 2010) -- If your amp was submerged or has sustained any water damage in the Nashville Flood, call Mercury Magnetics. Mercury is offering a free amp transformer service for all flood victim amps.

Here’s how it works: Mercury has designed a technology specifically to salvage and restore flood-damaged transformers. The process includes inspection and testing, a custom process of evacuating the moisture, and re-varnishing of any transformer without charge. They’re only asking that you pay the shipping each way.

“This is a vitally important service we’re offering. And we hope that everyone takes advantage of it," said Patrick Selfridge, Mercury’s Service & Support Network Manager. "Especially for the vintage and rare amps that otherwise are never going to sound the same if this process isn’t done correctly. There’s a potential tragedy of some historically important tone being lost forever if their transformers are not properly brought back to life. We’re proud to say that so far our engineers have a 90% success rate.”

Mercury advises owners not attempt to power up the amp without having the transformers serviced. To do so will almost certainly “fry” them. However, if a transformer was damaged beyond repair, Mercury will offer the choice of a rewind, replacement or upgrade at substantial discounts.

Contact Mercury for any questions or concerns you may have and for special shipping instructions.

For more information:
Mercury Magnetics

Photo 1

All photos courtesy SINGLECOIL (www.singlecoil.com)

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