Gibson Announces the Dave Mustaine Flying V EXP

Founder of the Grammy Award-winning Megadeth teams up with Gibson for the Dave Mustaine Flying V.


The Dave Mustaine Flying V EXP guitars are part of the Dave Mustaine Collection. The 25.5” scale mahogany neck has an ebony fretboard with a compound fretboard radius, 24 medium jumbo frets, mother of pearl “teeth” inlays, an Explorer-style headstock with Grover Mini Rotomatic tuners with Kidney buttons, and a Graph Tech nut. The mahogany Flying V-style body is equipped with a Tune-O-Matic bridge, a Stop Bar tailpiece, and a set of Dave Mustaine Signature Seymour Duncan Thrash Factor pickups. The Flying V’s are available in both an Antique Natural and a Silver Metallic nitrocellulose lacquer finish which are complemented by black chrome hardware. A hardshell case is also included.

Renowned worldwide and synonymous with metal guitar, Dave Mustaine founded Megadeth in 1984 and less than a year a later debuted with the release of Killing Is My Business… And Business Is Good! in 1985. Megadeth has gone on to sell more than 50 million albums worldwide, earning many accolades along the way, including a GRAMMY Award for the title track from their most recent album Dystopia, along with 12 additional GRAMMY nominations, as well as five consecutive platinum/multi-platinum albums. Megadeth has headlined many of the biggest stages in the world and recently played their most successful tour ever, closing every night on the North American amphitheater “Metal Tour of the Year”. Also, a New York Times bestselling author and sought after speaker, host, and commentator, Mustaine has remained a standard bearer for metal and heavy guitar rock, combining a musical and technical standard with the punk and rock n’ roll ethos and attitude.

Dave Mustaine Flying V™ EXP

EXP are now available in Antique Natural and Silver Metallic finishes at select global dealers and on Gibson.com.

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