Gibson Unveils the Elvis Dove and SJ-200​

Two Gibson-made acoustics honoring Elvis Presley's legacy: the Dove and SJ-200, both in Ebony.


The new Gibson Elvis Dove in Ebony features a solid Sitka spruce top, solid maple back, sides, and a mahogany neck capped with an Indian rosewood fretboard. The new Dove is equipped with a modern LR Baggs VTC electronics with an under-saddle piezo pickup and soundhole-mounted volume and tone controls, making it stage ready, right out of the case. The new Gibson Elvis SJ-200 features a maple back, sides, and neck, as well as a Sitka spruce top. The guitar features all of the attractive SJ-200 touches, including mother-of-pearl graduated crown and parallelogram inlays, an iconic Moustache bridge and an Indian rosewood fingerboard, and comes equipped with an LR Baggs VTC under-saddle pick up. As an extra personalized Elvis touch, both guitars come with a Kenpo Karate decal included in the hardshell case.

Elvis played multiple Gibson acoustic and electric guitars throughout his career. The new Gibson Elvis Dove in Ebony is based on a customized 1969 Gibson Dove that was gifted to the King of Rock ‘n’ Roll by his father, Vernon Presley, which Elvis played in concert regularly from 1971 through 1975, famously during Elvis’ legendary satellite-televised Aloha From Hawaii concert in 1973. In 1975, while in mid-performance during a concert in Asheville, NC, Elvis gifted the Gibson Dove to an astonished audience member.

Elvis SJ-200 and Dove

The Elvis Dove and SJ-200 are handmade by the expert luthiers and artisans of the Gibson Acoustic Custom Shop in Bozeman, Montana and are available today worldwide at authorized Gibson dealers and on www.gibson.com.

Dove: $4,699.00 USD. SJ-200: $5,299.00 USD.

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