Gretsch Introduces Updated Collection of Electromatic Jets and Lapsteels

After introducing modern upgrades to Electromatic Classic Hollow Bodies earlier this month, Gretsch launches its updated collection of Electromatic Jets and Lapsteels.


Electromatic Jet BT

The Jet BT has a chambered mahogany body with a maple top produces a rich, present mid-range with the perfect combination of attack and resonance. A pair of Black Top Broad’Tron Pickups deliver the tone you’d desire from a Jet: capable of aggressive overdrive with the definition needed for pristine clean tone. The combination of individual pickup volume controls, master tone and master volume with treble bleed circuit provides global control over your pickup and tone settings. The Jet BT Single-Cut comes in a left-handed configuration finished in Jade Metallic and in a right-handed configuration finished in Jade Metallic, Bristol Fog or Midnight Sapphire.

Electromatic Jet Baritone

Thanks to the balance of its solid mahogany body, the mini-humbuckers drive subsonic tones while keeping each note beautifully distinct. Measuring in at 29.75”, the extended scale neck allows B to B tuning — use it to add color and texture in the studio or to double a lead onstage for a fiery live sound. The Electromatic Jet Baritone is available with a fixed v-stoptail tailpiece finished in Bristol Fog or Imperial Stain or with a Bigsby tailpiece available in Midnight Sapphire.

Electromatic Junior Jet Bass II Short-Scale

These bass guitars sport all the classic Gretsch appointments delivering massive, room-filling subsonic tones that boom out from the solid basswood body and versatile pickups. The Junior Jet Bass has a smooth and balanced tonality that’s easily delivered through the comfortable, easy-to-play short-scale maple neck (30.3”) with laurel fingerboard. Low-end color, smoothness and comfort make this a bass guitar worthy of the Electromatic name. Available in Imperial Stain, Bristol Fog and Shell pink.

Electromatic Lap Steel

The Lap Steels produce one of the most unmistakable sounds out there:the beautifully rich electric Hawaiian guitar. Featuring a solid mahogany body and an intense tonal response that new and veteran players alike will appreciate. The single-coil pickup provides excellent note clarity, which sealed die-cast tuners keep locked-in. Available in the brand-new colors: Broadway Jade, Tahiti Red and Vintage White.

Introducing the New Gretsch Electromatic Jets

Introducing the New Gretsch G5700 Electromatic Lap Steel Guitars

More info at: www.gretschguitars.com

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