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Spector Introduces Revised USA NS Bass Series

Spector Introduces Revised USA NS Bass Series

Updated USA NS basses combine the most popular elements of Spector’s Brooklyn, Kramer, and modern Woodstock eras while expanding the line with new, player-focused options.


Spector announces the release of its updated USA NS series of basses crafted in the new Spector USA Custom Shop facility outside of Woodstock, New York. These iconic basses remain faithful to the intent of the original instruments while combining the most popular design elements of their nearly 50-year history, an expanding menu of player-focused options, and the increased consistency of modern manufacturing techniques.

These basses boast classic, player-favorite options, such as body contours, our proprietary bridge, and the custom appointments like matching headstocks, all drawn from Spector’s famed Brooklyn, Kramer, and modern Woodstock eras. They are also available with newer options or upgrades, including modern or vintage pickup spacing, improved fingerboard tapers, standard and thin neck profiles, and premium electronics and preamps.

Spector’s new-era USA NS bass in Natural finish.

In addition to the new basses, Spector has made significant investments in the brand's future with their new USA Custom Shop near Woodstock, New York. While maintaining tried and true hand-building methods, the facility harnesses modern manufacturing technology, such as 3D modeling, and overhauled CNC programming to foster growth and create more consistent and accurate versions of its flagship instruments.

Spector Marketing Manager Jeff Shreiner explains, “This new NS Revision project aims to incorporate the “best of” Spector’s storied history, all while remaining true to Ned Steinberger and Stuart Spector’s original 1977 design. It represents the first major project implemented by the new team at Spector and sets forth a standard for the future of the NS design.”

For more information, please visit spectorbass.com.

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