Vongon Introduces the Ultrasheer

Adding to the burgeoning company's product line of forward-thinking effects, Vongon has unveiled the new Ultrasheer reverb and vibrato pedal. With reverb modeled after the classic Lexicon 224 unit of the late 70s, and the vibrato being a digital pitch shifter that doesn't alter the sound, Ultrasheer offers up lush, fluid warbles that will effortlessly find a home on your pedal board or your studio's patchbay.


The reverb algorithm is based on the plate reverb sounds of the classic Lexicon 224 from 1978. The vibrato is a smooth and transparent digital pitch shifter that preserves the full bandwidth of your input signal without darkening the sound, which can be an issue with its analog counterparts. Two modulation waveforms are available: Cycle, which is a sine wave for classic Leslie-speaker-type sounds, and Random, which is a smoothed sample-and-hold waveform that creates pitch warbles similar to a warped vinyl or sun-baked cassette.

Features

  • 32 bit floating point DSP (except for 16 bit vintage reverb algorithm)
  • Independent bypass switches for Reverb and Vibrato for two effects in one package
  • Full bandwidth vibrato that doesn't darken the tone
  • Stereo / Mono modes automatically selected based on the cables plugged in
  • Wooden enclosure milled from single block of dark walnut
  • Matte black aluminum faceplate with gold traces

Vongon Ultrasheer with Electric Guitar

All Vongon pedals are designed and built in the company's Bay Area home. Street price is $449. Available in limited quantities directly from Vongon at www.vongon.com and through select dealers.

Kemper Profiler Stage, Nueral DSP Quad Cortex & Line 6 HX Stomp (clockwise from top)

A deep dive into faux amps, futuristic setups, and how to use modern technology’s powers for good.

The jump between analog and digital gear has never been more manageable. It no longer takes a rack full of outboard gear with a six-figure price tag to help realize not only the tone you have in your head, but the expansive workflows that started to pop up in the early ’80s. We’re now about a decade into the modern era of digital modelers and profilers and it seems like the technology has finally come into its own. “This is really the first time in a while where you can have bar bands playing the exactsame gear as stadium acts,” says Cooper Carter, a Fractal Audio Systems production consultant who has done sound design and rig building for Neal Schon, James Valentine, John Petrucci, and others.

Read More Show less

Master builder Dennis Galuszka recreates the legendary "Chicago" guitarist's legacy with a collectible, limited run guitar.

Read More Show less
x