Sahe Audio Announces ReKawl iPhone App

ReKawl uses your iPhone’s camera to capture the settings on your analog gear, as well as studio and live setups.

Sahe Audio, creator of Little Blondie microphones, announces the release of its new iPhone app, ReKawl.

ReKawl uses your iPhone’s camera to capture the settings on your analog gear, as well as studio and live setups. It also provides an instant map of your pedal board, eliminating the need for note taking or attempting to remember settings.

“The worst thing about being a musician is having inspiration and losing that memory of how it inspired you,” says Aman Sahi, of Sahe Audio, “If you can document that source of inspiration, you’re doing yourself justice as a musician and as a creator.”

ReKawl makes it easy to recreate an analog sound. The photos are easy to share and archive, and ReKawl keeps images separate from your regular photos, and lets you label quickly with gestures and taps.

The app is open-ended and can be customized to individual user needs. For example, touring musicians can organize sounds by set list, and guitar players can map out their stompboxes and pedal boards settings.

“I hope ReKawl allows people to remember that initial spark, that inspiration, and I hope people lose the fear of touching their gear settings,” says Sahi, “This will enable them to create more unique sounds, experiment and have fun.”

ReKawl is available now for download at $4.99, and a lite version without multiple tracks is also available for 99 cents.

For more information:
Rekawl.com

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Develop a better sense of subdivisions.
  • Understand how to play "over the bar line."
  • Learn to target chord tones in a 12-bar blues.
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