The Tonebug Distortion delivers tubey, classic-rock distortion, while the Fuel Tank Chameleon offers four separate voltage options.

Montreal, Quebec (February 17, 2010) -- Danish effects company T-Rex Engineering has announced the third member of it's Tonebug family of pedals, the Tonebug Distortion, along with the latest addition to its Feul Tank family of power supply units, the Feul Tank Chameleon. Here's what the company had to say about the new releases:
Tonebug Distortion
Tonebug Distortion is a phenomenal-sounding pedal that delivers gobs of rich, tubey-sounding distortion you’ll recognize instantly as a fundamental ingredient of classic guitar rock. A simple Gain knob lets you choose how dirty you want to get, while a Tone knob lets you tune the timbre of your distortion – from a muted bluesy crunch to a searing wail that’ll slice through anything in its way.

Like the Tonebug Reverb and Overdrive pedals, Tonebug Distortion delivers the same legendary T-Rex tone that’s made our top-end products a fixture on the pedal boards of guitar greats around the world. That, combined with cool retro design and rugged construction, makes Tonebug Distortion a pedal you just won’t want to play without.

T-Rex is scheduled to begin shipping the Tonebug Distortion in March 2010. MSRP: $129 ($99 MAP)

Fuel Tank Chameleon
Aptly named, the Fuel Tank Chameleon is the most versatile power supply T-Rex has ever produced. Built for players with a large number of diverse pedals, Fuel Tank Chameleon offers all the advantages of our other Fuel Tank power supplies, plus an unprecedented four separate voltage options.

What it Offers
• 6 separate outlets (use up to 5 simultaneously)
• Your choice of 9V DC, 12V DC, 18V DC or 12V AC power
• Isolated, 300mA outlets (1,500mA total)
• Switchable 115V or 230V mains
• All the cables you need
• Compact, rugged, road-ready design
• Legendary T-Rex quality

The Fuel Tank Chameleon is only the latest addition to the T-Rex Fuel Tank family. The original Fuel Tank Classic, ideal for medium-sized pedal board, features five outlets and comes with plenty of single patch cables and a multiple link cable. The Fuel Tank Juicy Lucy powers 5 x 12V pedals and also offers great extras, like multiple unit linking. The baby of the family, Fuel Tank Junior, is a good choice for a small number of 9V pedals. It offers both currency doubling to 240 mA and voltage doubling to 18V.

T-Rex is scheduled to begin shipping the Fuel Tank Chameleon in March 2010. MSRP $249 ($199 MAP)
For more information:
T-Rex Engineering

How jangle, glam, punk, shoegaze, and more blended to create a worldwide phenomenon. Just don’t forget your tambourine.

Intermediate

Beginner

  • Learn genre-defining elements of Britpop guitar.
  • Use the various elements to create your own Britpop songs.
  • Discover how “borrowing” from the best can enrich your own playing.
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When considering the many bands that fall under the term “Britpop”–Oasis, Blur, Suede, Elastica, Radiohead’s early work, and more–it’s clear that the genre is more an attitude than a specific musical style. Still, there are a few guitar techniques and approaches that abound in the genre, many of which have been “borrowed” (the British music press’ friendly way of saying “appropriated”) from earlier British bands of the 1960s, ’70s, and ’80s.

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"'If I fall and somehow my career ends on that particular day, then so be it," Joe Bonamassa says of his new hobby, bicycling. "If it's over, it's over. You've got to enjoy your life."

Photo by Steve Trager

For his stylistically diverse new album, the fiery guitar hero steps back from his gear obsession and focuses on a deep pool of influences and styles.

Twenty years ago, Joe Bonamassa was a struggling musician living in New York City. He survived on a diet of peanut butter and jelly sandwiches and ramen noodles that he procured from the corner bodega at Columbus Avenue and 83rd Street. Like many dreamers waiting for their day in the sun, Joe also played "Win for Life" every week. It was, in his words, "literally my ticket out of this hideous business." While the lottery tickets never brought in the millions, Joe's smokin' guitar playing on a quartet of albums from 2002 to 2006—So, It's Like That, Blues Deluxe, Had to Cry Today, and You & Me—did get the win, transforming Joe into a guitar megastar.

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