jhs pedals

Kenny Greenberg with his main axe, a vintage Gretsch 6118 Double Anniversary that he found at Gruhn Guitars in Nashville for a mere $600. “It had the original pickups, but the finish had been taken off and the headstock had been repaired. So, it’s a great example of a ‘player’s vintage instrument,’” he says.

On his solo debut, the Nashville session wizard discovers his own musical personality in a soundtrack for a movie that wasn’t, with stops in Africa and Mississippi hill country.

Kenny Greenberg has been Nashville’s secret weapon for decades. He’s the guitarist many insiders credit with giving the Nashville sound the rock ’n’ roll edge that’s become de rigueur for big country records since the ’90s. It’s the sound that, in many ways, delivered country music from its roots to sporting events.

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Revisit the original Russian Muff!

 

Ratings

Pros:
A sweet sounding distillate of Russian Big Muff virtues. Handsome, high-quality build.

Cons:
Hard to determine control levels. Some settings sound too civilized and compressed.

Street:
$179

JHS Crimson
jhspedals.com


Tones:


Ease of Use:


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Value:
 
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Rick Beato gets the string-gauge experiment started with a Les Paul Standard running through a Marshall JCM2000.

...There's a lot more to it than whether Billy Gibbons or SRV was "right."

Greetings, tone hounds! I'd like to discuss two terrific YouTube videos Rick Beato and Rhett Shull recently made regarding string gauges. In Rick's video, a group of players recorded themselves playing the same Les Paul and Marshall JCM2000 setup with the only variable being four different gauged sets: .011, .010, .009, and .008. Both videos reveal the differences in tone between different gauges, and I'd like to expand on this by adding a few observations I've discovered over the years.

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