An analog-flavored delay with a pitch LFO that modulates the delay trails.

One of my favorite pedals of all time is the Boss TR-2 tremolo because it can achieve slow-to-fast, almost LFO like tremolos that, when paired with a delay, are a pretty deadly combo. And for any player who values unusual tones and textures, the fact that the SubDecay Anamnesis Echo so effectively approximates that magical synthesis of modulation and delay in a single pedal is a reason for celebration. The SubDecay takes an interesting approach to modulated delay that goes deeper, however. By pairing a digital delay to an LFO with exceptionally wide ranges of speed and intensity, the device achieves a unique modulated-delay sound.

Crossing Curved Space
The SubDecay packs five controls and an LED indicator, bypass switch, power, and in/out jacks into a single MXR-style enclosure. Beyond the typical level (blend), regen, and time knobs found on countless other delays, there are very potent controls for LFO depth and speed. There’s also an internal switch (accessed by removing the back plate) that allows the delay decay to continue repeating once the bypass has been engaged.

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The Wolftone Chaos is capable of tricks that make it more than just another fuzz with an unconventional voice.

There are a lot of unruly fuzzes and unique distortions out there these days, but back in the early 2000s, pedal designer Todd Wolfgram and Studio Electronics introduced the Wolftone Helium and Chaos—pedals that became legendary in fuzz circles for their very original, unusual takes on octave and modulated distortion. Now, Malekko Heavy Industries has enlisted Wolfgram to bring back the Helium and the Chaos, the latter of which is reviewed here.

Like the original, the Wolftone Chaos is capable of tricks that make it more than just another fuzz with an unconventional voice. Many players will use terms like “ring-mod-like” to describe its tones, but the Chaos actually delivers much more than that—and more than a simple replication of the Studio Electronics original. Its impressive tones range from radical to understated.

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If you’re a fan of out-of-the-ordinary guitar tones, you’re probably intrigued by Electro-Harmonix’ Freeze pedal. The ability to sample a little chunk of sound and then mangle it with

If you’re a fan of out-of-the-ordinary guitar tones, you’re probably intrigued by Electro-Harmonix’ Freeze pedal. The ability to sample a little chunk of sound and then mangle it with effects pedals—effectively enabling players to turn their pedal boards into modular synths—has kept adventurous guitarists twitching with the sense of possibility.

Never a company to rest on their laurels, Electro-Harmonix has now introduced the Superego, which builds on the Freeze principle with cool auto mode, an effects loop, and a gliss control that behaves like a portamento when moving between notes. For sonic tweakers, this is the kind of device that makes it hard to hold back mad-scientist cackles.

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Ever feel like your amp doesn’t quite reach the potential that its formidable exterior suggests? Or that you can’t match your bandmates’ volume when you need to? Sometimes we

Ever feel like your amp doesn’t quite reach the potential that its formidable exterior suggests? Or that you can’t match your bandmates’ volume when you need to? Sometimes we all need a boost to the right orbital altitude.

Maxon’s new DB10 Dual Booster puts a more versatile and powerful propulsion system at your disposal. With two distinctly voiced boost circuits and 20 dB of boost on each, it’s got color galore and enough gain to launch you into that perfect orbit without ruining your tone.

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