DigiTech Introduces JamMan Solo and JamMan Stereo Looper Pedals

Two new loopers from the makers of the original JamMan.

Anaheim, CA (January 14, 2010) -- DigiTech has introduced the JamMan Solo and JamMan Stereo Looper pedals. The JamMan Stereo features true stereo loops as well as reverse playback, making it perfect for playing backing tracks, while the JamMan Solo is designed for the guitarist or bassist looking for a full-featured looper in a compact form.

Both also feature the ability to store 35 minutes of CD-quality loops in 99 loops internally as well as having a SD memory card expansion slot, giving the artist the ability to store up to 16 hours of material in the JamMan Stereo and 48 hours of material in the JamMan Solo in an additional 99 slots.

The JamMan Solo and JamMan Stereo feature USB connectivity and will sync to DigiTech’s free JamManager software that organizes and saves your JamMan loops to a PC or Mac. The software also provides the user with the capability to create JamLists and have them available for use anytime.

“We reinvented loopers nearly a decade ago with the original JamMan and now we are reinventing loops again with the introduction of the JamMan Stereo and Solo. We are always striving to give guitarists and bassists new ways to be creative and unique with their tone and these new loopers give players the ability to do that whether they are practicing at home, performing on stage or anything in between,” stated Jason Lamb, Marketing Manager for DigiTech.

Both loopers also include a USB port to transfer loops to and from a computer, metronome with multiple rhythm sounds and time signatures, automatic recording, and Hands-Free functionality. The JamMan Stereo also features a balanced, professional grade, low impedance XLR mic input with a dedicated gain control.

For more information:
DigiTech

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