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E.W.S. Announces Scott Henderson Subtle Volume Control

E.W.S. Announces Scott Henderson Subtle Volume Control

The SVC allows better control of overall volume without unnatural volume changes

Van Nuys, CA (August 6, 2009) -- E.W.S. has announced the new  Subtle Volume Control, or SVC. The SVC began as an idea of guitarist Scott Henderson, who developed it in conjunction with PCI (Prosound Communications Inc).

The device is designed to provide better control of overall volume than traditional volume pedals. With subtle increases or decreases in volume, your audience may never realize that you’ve changed your volume.

Explains Scott, "'I've heard this many times - during a live guitar solo, the bassist and drummer try to start the solo at a softer volume, while the guitar volume is much louder than it should be. Then by the end of the solo, the guitarist is completely drowned out by the band. Some guitarists use a traditional volume pedal to try to ride their solos to match the band, but because of the short throw of the pedal, their foot actions can easily be heard by the audience and it sounds very unnatural."

The SVC is designed to be foot-operated and placed in the effects loop of an amp, allowing the player to control volume without changing the gain that's been dialed in at the front of the preamp. The SVC can also be used between the last pedal in a chain and the front of the amp, but keeping gain consistent while changing volume will not be as effective.

Because the SVC is not an effect, it does not require any power source. Since the signal coming from the amp effects loop is low impedance, the cables running from the amp to the SVC will not degrade the sound.

MSRP: $60

For more information:
EWS
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