Electro-Harmonix Introduces POG2

EH''s new POG2 adds attack control, a second sub-octave control and more

Long Island, NY (June 3, 2009) -- Electro-Harmonix has announced the new POG2 polyphonic octave generator. Expanding upon 2005's POG, the POG2 adds attack control, a second sub-octave, the capability to save settings and more.

EH's product page says, "Use the new attack control to fade in lush, smooth swells. Tune in the new second sub-octave to reach deeper than ever before. The 2 pole resonant low pass filter now includes two additional Q modes. Slide in the newly enhanced detune to further refine your sound.

"The POG2 delivers unrivaled tonal variations -- and now you can save your favorite settings, and recall them with a click. The POG2 just plain sounds better, thanks to an enhanced algorithm that delivers a more focused and in-the-the pocket harmonic performance. And all this is now packed into our rugged and pedalboard-friendly diecast chassis."

Specs:
True bypass
Totally programmable 8-preset memory with instant recall
5 mixable polyphonic octave harmonics
Attack delay slider controls the fade-in speed of the octaves
Low Pass filter with selectable Q
Dry signal can be routed through the Attack, LP, and Detune faders
Flawless polyphonic glitch-free tracking
Can be daisy chained with other pedals and power supplies
9DC-200 power supply included

For more information:
Electro-Harmonix

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