Premier Collector #3: Vintage Fender Amps and Guitars

Five Fender amps from the sixties and seventies, and 15 vintage and newer guitars make Lorne Sheaves'' collection.



Lorne Sheaves has only been collecting guitars for the past 4-5 years, and already has an impressive stash. Beginning with the black 1987 American Stratocaster -- a Christmas present from his parents -- the collection grew exponentially.

Says Lorne, "I got all this gear over time with a very understanding wife, but it does drive her crazy when I play it too loud."

To have your collection featured as a Premier Collector, send pictures and descriptions to rebecca@premierguitar.com.


click for a larger photo
Left to right (guitars): 1988 American Strat, 1975 Mustang Bass, 1980 Fender Bullet, 1999 Fender American Tele, 1989 Fender American Strat, 1976 Fender Tele Bass, 2006 Gretsch 5120, 2002 Gibson Explorer, 2006 Gibson Les Paul Standard, 1977 Fender Jazz Bass, 1975 Fender Mustang, 1988 Fender American Tele, 1972 Fender Tele Thinline, 1987 American Fender Strat, 1993 Fender American Strat
Left to right (amps): 1974 Fender Twin Reverb, 1974 Fender Bassman (back), 1965 Fender Bandmaster (middle), 1976 Fender Princeton (front), 1971 Fender Super Reverb

To join Lorne as a Premier Collector, send an e-mail with photos and a description of your gear to rebecca@premierguitar.com

Premier Collector #2: Gibson Customs and Modded Marshalls
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Can an entry-level modeler hang with the big dogs?

Excellent interface. Very portable. Nice modulation tones.

Some subpar low-gain dirt sounds. Could be a little more rugged.

$399

HeadRush MX5
headrushfx.com

3.5
4
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4.5

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Photo by Steve Trager

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