The Onyx Blackjack and the Onyx Blackbird will be available in August and come with Tracktion 3 Music Production Software.

Woodinville, WA (July 20, 2010) -- Mackie announces two new premium recording interfaces, additions to the popular Onyx family — the Onyx Blackjack and Onyx Blackbird. These new interfaces combine the sonic benefits of Mackie’s proven Onyx mic preamps with high-end Cirrus Logic AD/DA converters and workflow-friendly features for people starting or expanding upon their studio.


The Onyx Blackjack is an ultra-compact desktop 2x2 USB interface, perfect for the home studio. It features two acclaimed Onyx mic preamp channels, each featuring built-in DIs for connecting guitars, etc. Separate level control for studio monitors and headphones, along with true analog hardware monitoring take the guesswork out of zero-latency recording. It is bus-powered, with a rugged, ergonomic chassis for both portable and home studio applications.


The rackmount Onyx Blackbird delivers studio-grade recording via eight Onyx mic preamps. A 16x16 FireWire interface, Blackbird also features 8x8 ADAT and wordclock I/O, providing ultimate expandability. There are two "Super Channels" on the front panel with dedicated low-cut switches, phantom power and true hardware monitoring options for quick zero-latency tracking. The other channels are equally flexible, utilizing the powerful Blackbird Control DSP Matrix Mixer for quick setup of independent mixes and the ability to route any input to any output. Monitor, main, alt and dual headphone outs with dedicated source selection and level control ensures there are plenty of mix routing options.

The Onyx Blackjack and Onyx Blackbird are Mac/PC compatible, work with most major DAWs and include Tracktion 3 Music Production Software. Both interfaces will be available worldwide in August 2010. The Onyx Blackjack will have a MSRP of $259.99. The Onyx Blackbird will have a MSRP of $749.99.

For more information:
Mackie

Source: Press Release

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