Damaged guitars have been donated from Peter Frampton, Keb’Mo, Steve Earle, Keith Urban, Brad Paisley, Vince Gill, John Hiatt, and more.

Nashville, TN (October 26, 2010) – Some of the guitars damaged in May’s catastrophic Nashville flooding are being auctioned to raise money for flood relief for the city’s music community in a project called NasH2O. Damaged guitars have been donated from Peter Frampton, Keb’Mo, Steve Earle, Keith Urban, Brad Paisley, Vince Gill, John Hiatt, and more. The auctions are being held in four waves that started on October 12 and will run through December 10.

NasH2O is being spearheaded by luthier Joe Glaser, George Gruhn of Gruhn Guitars, and steel guitarist Bruce Bouton. All of the funds raised will be distributed through MusicCares Nashville Flood Relief Fund, Nashville Musicians Association Flood Relief Fund, and Fireman’s Fund National Philanthropic program. Both the MusiCares and Nashville Musicians Association funds are dedicated to helping Nashville musicians affected by the flood—many without insurance—get back on their feet.


The first auction lot ends on October 27. Currently, the top draw in this wave is Peter Frampton’s three-pickup “Black Beauty” signature Gibson Les Paul Custom, signed by Frampton (pictured above). Other highlights from the first wave include John Jorgenson’s green sparkle Chandler guitar, Brent Mason’s thinline D’Angelico New Yorker (early-2000s import), and Keith Urban’s Mini Maton 12-string acoustic.

The second lot runs from November 1 – 10. Highlights include Duane Eddy’s recent model Gretsch 6120DSV/Chet Atkins guitar, studio bassist Kevin Grantt’s ’59 Fender Precision bass, and Vince Gill’s Duesenberg Starplayer TV.

The third lot auction is active from November 15 – 24 and includes Keith Urban’s early ‘60s Airline guitar, Brent Mason’s Jerry Jones baritone, Keb’Mo’s Giannini Requinto Brazilian mini guitar, and Amy Grant’s McPherson MG 3.5 acoustic.

The fourth and final lot will run from November 29 – December 10 and includes Brad Paisley’s Bill Crook gold and black paisley Tele-style guitar with B-bender, Brent Mason’s 1967 Rickenbacker 36 12-string, Vince Gill’s Gibson J-60 acoustic, and a brand new Martin DX 175th Anniversary model autographed by Grand Ole Opry artists at the Opry’s reopening night on October 9, 2010.

NasH2O says that more guitars continue to be donated and will be added to the existing four auction waves. In addition, Collings, Paul Reed Smith, and Martin have donated brand new guitars for a sweepstakes to help promote the auctions. Winners will be chosen from people who are members of the NasH2O community, have bid on an item, or have donated to the cause.

For more information:
NasH2O

There’s way more than blues-rock fodder buried in the crevices of the most overused scale in music.

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  • Explain how chords are generated from scales.
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Last updated on May 21, 2022

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